100 Years of International Women’s Day


[A vintage postcard from 1916, image source]

A few IWD linky links:

* Carol Pateman’s essay reflects on the progress of the women’s movement and the difficulties still facing women: “Securing women’s citizenship: Indifference and other obstacles”.

* Fuck Politeness writes angrily about the lack of IWD coverage in the mainstream press: “Happy Fucking International Women’s Day”.

* This was posted last month at Blue Milk; a short video about a Sydney boy’s school tackling issues of gender inequality: “What if boys cared about gender inequality?”

* Sociological Images takes a look at a few vintage posters for women’s suffrage: “Facets of the Women’s Suffrage Movement”. Similarly, an earlier post examines vintage postcards (like the one above) in “How Suffragist Postcards Got Out the Vote”.

EDIT: I’ve found a few more links worth sharing.

* In The Age, Eva Cox writes: “Macho economics still rules the agenda”.

* At The Drum, Clementine Ford cheekily writes: “Simple steps to become a real femininist”.

* And perhaps my favourite for the day, by Annabel Crabb: “Behind every successful woman there’s a wife”. She writes:

The problem is that it’s still just as hard for men to get out of paid work as it has been – historically – for women to get into it.

After a long hard slog, paid parental leave for women is starting to become accepted.

Paid parental leave for men – hell, any sort of leave beyond the routine two weeks of patting and burping that most working new Dads in this country take – is still something of an exotic event.

Why are our discussions about women in the workplace always about the barriers that block women’s entry to it, and almost never about the barriers that block men’s exit from it, when practically speaking, the latter phenomenon is such a significant cause of the former?

Why are we always talking about women’s rights to work more, and hardly ever about men’s rights to enjoy the same workplace flexibility that we have amassed?

How can women ever have equality in the workplace, when there are still so many barriers standing between men and equal opportunity in the home?

Got any good links to help celebrate International Women’s Day? Send them my way! Comment below! Happy IWD everyone!

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5 Responses to “100 Years of International Women’s Day”

  1. blue milk Says:

    Thanks for including me, and I really enjoyed seeing who else you found and chose for this. Also linked to you on Hoyden About Town.

  2. Angelika Says:

    from Germany :

    http://maedchenmannschaft.net/

    from the UK :

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/international-womens-day

  3. suzysiu Says:

    I really like this article, the opening anecdote is powerful.
    http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/society-and-culture/stuck-on-an-uneven-playing-field-20110304-1bhrj.html

    “About 60 per cent of fathers of infants don’t change a nappy.” Who are these fathers? Not people I know.

    • doctorpen Says:

      Oh thanks for this link, suzysiu! I hadn’t seen it! What a great piece by Adele Horin (as usual). Her examples resonate with the stories I heard during my interviews with young women.

      I really like the way she makes clear that the system needs to change not just to improve women’s lives, but to improve the experiences of men and children too.

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